Add TAGS to your cases to easily locate them or to build your SYLLABUS.
Please SIGN IN to use this feature.
https://lawyerly.ph/juris/view/ce2ae?user=fbGU2WFpmaitMVEVGZ2lBVW5xZ2RVdz09
[CIPRIANO P. PRIMICIAS v. VALERIANO E. FUGOSO](https://lawyerly.ph/juris/view/ce2ae?user=fbGU2WFpmaitMVEVGZ2lBVW5xZ2RVdz09)
{case:ce2ae}
Highlight text as FACTS, ISSUES, RULING, PRINCIPLES to generate case DIGESTS and REVIEWERS.
Please LOGIN use this feature.
Show opinions
Show as cited by other cases (2 times)
Show printable version with highlights

[ GR No. L-1800, Jan 27, 1948 ]

CIPRIANO P. PRIMICIAS v. VALERIANO E. FUGOSO +

80 Phil. 71

[ G.R. No. L-1800, January 27, 1948 ]

CIPRIANO P. PRIMICIAS, GENERAL CAMPAIGN MANAGER OF COALESCED MINORITY PARTIES, PETITIONER, VS. VALERIANO E. FUGOSO, MAYOR OF CITY OF MANILA, RESPONDENT.

FERIA, J.:

This is an action of mandamus instituted by the petitioner Cipriano Primicias, a campaign manager of the Coalesced Minority Parties against Valeriano Fugoso, as Mayor of the City of Manila, to compel the latter to issue a permit for the holding of a public meeting at Plaza Miranda on Sunday afternoon, November 16, 1947, for the purpose of petitioning the government for redress to grievances on the ground that the respondent refused to grant such permit. Due to the urgency of the case, this Court, after mature deliberation, issued a writ of mandamus, as prayed for in the petition on November 15, 1947, without prejudice to writing later an extended and reasoned decision.

The right to freedom of speech, and to peacefully assemble and petition the government for redress of grievances, are fundamental personal rights of the people recognized and guaranteed by the constitutions of democratic countries. But it is a settled principle growing out of the nature of well-ordered civil societies that the exercise of those rights is not absolute for it may be so regulated that it shall not be injurious to the equal enjoyment of others having equal rights, nor injurious to the rights of the community or society. The power to regulate the exercise of such and other constitutional rights is termed the sovereign "police power," which is the power to prescribe regulations, to promote the health, morals, peace, education, good order or safety, and general welfare of the people. This sovereign police power is exercised by the government through its legislative branch by the enactment of laws regulating those and other constitutional and civil rights, and it may be delegated to political subdivisions, such as towns, municipalities and cities by authorizing their legislative bodies called municipal and city councils to enact ordinances for the purpose.

The Philippine Legislature has delegated the exercise of the police power to the Municipal Board of the City of Manila, which according to section 2439 of the Administrative Code is the legislative body of the City. Section 2444 of the same Code grants the Municipal Board, among others, the following legislative powers, to wit: "(p) to provide for the prohibition and suppression of riots, affrays, disturbances and disorderly assemblies, (u) to regulate the use of streets, avenues, * * * parks, cemeteries and other public places" and "for the abatement of nuisances in the same," and "(ee) to enact all ordinances it may deem necessary and proper for sanitation and safety, the furtherance of prosperity and the promotion of morality, peace, good order, comfort, convenience, and general welfare of the city and its inhabitants."

Under the above delegated power, the Municipal Board of the City of Manila, enacted sections 844 and 1119. Section 844 of the Revised Ordinances of 1927 prohibits as an offense against public peace, and section 1262 of the same Revised Ordinance penalizes as a misdemeanor, "any act, in any public place, meeting, or procession, tending to disturb the peace or excite a riot; or collect with other persons in a body or crowd for any unlawful purpose; or disturb or disquiet any congregation engaged in any lawful assembly." And section 1119 provides the following:

"SEC. 1119. Free for use of public. The streets and public places of the city shall be kept free and clear for the use of the public, and the sidewalks and crossings for the pedestrians, and the same shall only be used or occupied for other purposes as provided by ordinance or regulation: Provided, That the holding of athletic games, sports, or exercises during the celebration of national holidays in any streets or public places of the city and on the patron saint day of any district in question, may be permitted by means of a permit issued by the Mayor, who shall determine the streets or public places, or portions thereof, where such athletic games, sports, or exercises may be held: And provided, further, That the holding of any parade or procession in any streets or public places is prohibited unless a permit therefor is first secured from the Mayor, who shall, on every such occasion, determine or specify the streets or public places for the formation, route, and dismissal of such parade or procession: And provided, finally, That all applications to hold a parade or procession shall be submitted to the Mayor not less than twenty-four hours prior to the holding of such parade or procession."

As there is no express and separate provision in the Revised Ordinance of the City regulating the holding of public meeting or assembly at any street or public places, the provisions of said section 1119 regarding the holding of any parade or procession in any street or public places may be applied by analogy to meeting and assembly in any street or public places.

Said provision is susceptible of two constructions: one is that the Mayor of the City of Manila is vested with unregulated discretion to grant or refuse to grant permit for the holding of a lawful assembly or meeting, parade, or procession in the streets and other public places of the City of Manila; and the other is that the applicant has the right to a permit which shall be granted by the Mayor, subject only to the latter's reasonable discretion to determine or specify the streets or public places to be used for the purpose, with a view to prevent confusion by overlapping, to secure convenient use of the streets and public places by others, and to provide adequate and proper policing to minimize the risk of disorder.

After a mature deliberation, we have arrived at the conclusion that we must adopt the second construction, that is, construe the provisions of the said ordinance to mean that it does not confer upon the Mayor the power to refuse to grant the permit, but only the discretion, in issuing the permit, to determine or specify the streets or public places where the parade or procession may pass or the meeting may be held.

Our conclusion finds support in the decision in the case of Willis Cox vs. State of New Hampshire, 312 U. S., 569. In that case, the statute of New Hampshire P. L. chap. 145, section 2, providing that "no parade or procession upon any ground abutting thereon, shall be permitted unless a special license therefor shall first be obtained from the selectmen of the town or from licensing committee," was construed by the Supreme Court of New Hampshire as not conferring upon the licensing board unfettered discretion to refuse to grant the license, and held valid. And the Supreme Court of the United States, in its decision (1941) penned by Chief Justice Hughes affirming the judgment of the State Supreme Court, held that "a statute requiring persons using the public streets for a parade or procession to procure a special license therefor from the local authorities is not an unconstitutional abridgment of the rights of assembly or of freedom of speech and press, where, as the statute is construed by the state courts, the licensing authorities are strictly limited, in the issuance of licenses, to a consideration of the time, place, and manner of the parade or procession, with a view to conserving the public convenience and of affording an opportunity to provide proper policing, and are not invested with arbitrary discretion to issue or refuse license, * * *."

We cannot adopt the other alternative construction or construe the ordinance under consideration as conferring upon the Mayor power to grant or refuse to grant the permit, which would be tantamount to authorizing him to prohibit the use of the streets and other public places for holding of meetings, parades or processions, because such a construction would make the ordinance invalid and void or violative of the constitutional limitations. As the Municipal Board is empowered only to regulate the use of streets, parks, and other public places, and the word "regulate," as used in section 2444 of the Revised Administrative Code, means and includes the power to control, to govern, and to restrain, but can not be construed as synonymous with "suppress" or "prohibit" (Kwong Sing vs. City of Manila, 41 Phil., 103), the Municipal Board can not grant the Mayor a power which it does not have. Besides, as the powers and duties of the Mayor as the Chief Executive of the City are executive, and one of them is "to comply with and enforce and give the necessary orders for the faithful performance and execution of the laws and ordinances" (section 2434 [b] of the Revised Administrative Code), the legislative police power of the Municipal Board to enact ordinances regulating reasonably the exercise of the fundamental personal right of the citizens in the streets and other public places, can not be delegated to the Mayor or any other officer by conferring upon him unregulated discretion or without laying down rules to guide and control his action by which its impartial execution can be secured or partiality and oppression prevented.

In City of Chicago vs. Trotter, 136 Ill., 430, it was held by the Supreme Court of Illinois that, under Rev. St. Ill. c. 24, article 5 section 1, which empowers city councils to regulate the use of the public streets, the council has no power to ordain that no processions shall be allowed upon the streets until a permit shall be obtained from the superintendent of police, leaving the issuance of such permits to his discretion, since the powers conferred on the council cannot be delegated by them.

The Supreme Court of Wisconsin in State ex rel. Garrabad vs. Dering, 84 Wis., 585; 54 N. W., 1104, held the following:

"The objections urged in the case of City of Baltimore vs. Radecke, 49 Md., 217, were also, in substance, the same, for the ordinance in that case upon its face committed to the unrestrained will of a single public officer the power to determine the rights of parties under it, when there was nothing in the ordinance to guide or control his action, and it was held void because 'it lays down no rules by which its impartial execution can be secured, or partiality and oppression prevented,' and that 'when we remember that action or nonaction may proceed from enmity or prejudice, from partisan zeal or animosity, from favoritism and other improper influences and motives easy of concealment and difficult to be detected and exposed, it becomes unnecessary to suggest or to comment upon the injustice capable of being wrought under cover of such a power, for that becomes apparent to every one who gives to the subject a moment's consideration. In fact, an ordinance which clothes a single individual with such power hardly falls within the domain of law, and we are constrained to pronounce it inoperative and void.' * * * In the exercise of the police power, the common council may, in its discretion, regulate the exercise of such rights in a reasonable manner, but can not suppress them, directly or indirectly, by attempting to commit the power of doing so to the mayor or any other officer. The discretion with which the council is vested is a legal discretion, to be exercised within the limits of the law, and not a discretion to transcend it or to confer upon any city officer an arbitrary authority, making him in its exercise a petty tyrant."

In re Frazee, 63 Michigan 399, 30 N. W., 72, a city ordinance providing that "no person or persons, or associations or organizations shall march, parade, ride, or drive, in or upon or through the public streets of the City of Grand Rapids with musical instrument, banners, flags, * * * without having first obtained the consent of the mayor or common council of said city;" was held by the Supreme Court of Michigan to be unreasonable and void. Said Supreme Court in the course of its decision held:

"* * * We must therefore construe this charter, and the powers it assumes to grant, so far as it is not plainly unconstitutional, as only conferring such power over the subjects referred to as will enable the city to keep order, and suppress mischief, in accordance with the limitations and conditions required by the rights of the people themselves, as secured by the principles of law, which cannot be less careful of private rights under a constitution than under the common law.

"It is quite possible that some things have a greater tendency to produce danger and disorder in the cities than in smaller towns or in rural places. This may justify reasonable precautionary measures, but nothing further; and no inference can extend beyond the fair scope of powers granted for such a purpose, and no grant of absolute discretion to suppress lawful action altogether can be granted at all. * * *

"It has been customary, from time immemorial, in all free countries, and in most civilized countries, for people who are assembled for common purposes to parade together, by day or reasonable hours at night, with banners and other paraphernalia, and with music of various kinds. These processions for political, religious, and social demonstrations are resorted to for the express purpose of keeping unity of feeling and enthusiasm, and frequently to produce some effect on the public mind by the spectacle of union and numbers. They are a natural product and exponent of common aims, and valuable factors in furthering them. * * * When people assemble in riotous mobs, and move for purposes opposed to private or public security, they become unlawful, and their members and abettors become punishable. * * *

"It is only when political, religious, social, or other demonstrations create public disturbances, or operate as nuisance, or create or manifestly threaten some tangible public or private or private mischief, that the law interferes.

"This by-law is unreasonable, because it suppresses what is in general perfectly lawful, and because it leaves the power of permitting or restraining processions, and their courses, to an unregulated official discretion, when the whole matter, if regulated at all, must be by permanent, legal provisions, operating generally and impartially."

In Rich vs. Napervill, 42 Ill., App. 222, the question was raised as to the validity of the city ordinance which made it unlawful for any person, society or club, or association of any kind, to parade any of the streets, with flags, banners, or transparencies, drums, horns, or other musical instruments, without the permission of the city council first had and obtained. The appellants were members of the Salvation Army, and were prosecuted for a violation of the ordinance, and the court in holding the ordinance invalid said, "Ordinances to be valid must be reasonable; they must not be oppressive; they must be fair and impartial; they must not be so framed as to allow their enforcement to rest in official discretion * * * Ever since the landing of the Pilgrims from the Mayflower the right to assemble and worship according to the dictates of one's conscience, and the right to parade in a peaceable manner and for a lawful purpose, have been fostered and regarded as among the fundamental rights of a free people. The spirit of our free institutions allows great latitude in public parades and demonstrations whether religious or political * * * If this ordinance is held valid, then may the city council shut off the parades of those whose nations do not suit their views and tastes in politics or religion, and permit like parades of those whose notions do. When men in authority are permitted in their discretion to exercise power so arbitrary, liberty is subverted, and the spirit of our free institutions violated. * * * Where the granting of the permit is left to the unregulated discretion of a small body of city eldermen, the ordinance cannot be other than partial and discriminating in its practical operation. The law abhors partiality and discrimination. * * *" (19 L. R. A., p. 861.)

In the case of Trujillo vs. City of Walsenburg, 108 Col., 427; 118 P. [2d], 1081, the Supreme Court of Colorado, in construing the provision of section 1 of Ordinance No. 273 of the City of Walsenburg, which provides: "That it shall be unlawful for any person or persons or association to use the street of the City of Walsenburg, Colorado, for any parade, procession or assemblage without first obtaining a permit from the Chief of Police of the City of Walsenburg so to do," held the following:

"[1] The power of municipalities, under our state law, to regulate the use of public streets is conceded. '35 C.S.A., chapter 163, section 10, subparagraph 7. 'The privilege of a citizen of the United States to use the streets * * * may be regulated in the interest of all; it is not absolute, but relative, and must be exercised in subordination to the general comfort and convenience, and in consonance with peace and good order; but it must not, in the guise of regulation, be abridged or denied.' Hague, Mayor, vs. Committee for Industrial Organization, 307 U.S., 496, 516; 59 S. Ct., 954, 964; 83 Law. ed., 1423.

[2, 3] An excellent statement of the power of a municipality to impose regulations in the use of public streets is found in the recent case of Cox vs. New Hampshire, 312 U. S., 569; 61 S. Ct., 762, 765; 85 Law. ed., 1049; 133 A.L.R., 1936, in which the following appears: 'The authority of a municipality to impose regulations in order to assure the safety and convenience of the people in the use of public highways has never been regarded as inconsistent with civil liberties but rather as one of the means of safeguarding the good order upon which they ultimately depend. The control of travel on the streets of cities is the most familiar illustration of this recognition of social need. Where a restriction of the use of highways in that relation is designed to promote the public convenience in the interest of all, it cannot be disregarded by the attempted exercise of some civil right which in other circumstances would be entitled to protection. One would not be justified in ignoring the familiar red traffic light because he thought it his religious duty to disobey the municipal command or sought by that means to direct public attention to an announcement of his opinions. As regulation of the use of the streets for parades and processions is a traditional exercise of control by local government, the question in a particular case is whether that control is exerted so as not to deny or unwarrantedly abridge the right of assembly and the opportunities for the communication of thought and the discussion of public questions immemorially associated with resort to public places. Lovell vs. Criffin, 303 U.S., 444, 451; 58 S. Ct., 666, 668, 82 Law. ed., 949 [953]; Hague vs. Committee for Industrial Organization, 307 U.S., 496, 515, 516; 59 S. Ct., 954, 963, 964; 83 Law. ed., 1423 [1436, 1437]; Scheneider vs. State of New Jersey [Town of Irvington]; 308 U. S., 147, 160; 60 S. Ct., 146, 150; 84 Law. ed., 155 [164]; Cantwell vs. Connecticut, 310 U.S., 296, 306, 307; 60 S. Ct., 900, 904; 84 Law. ed., 1213 [1219, 1220]; 128 A.L.R. 1352.'

[4] Our concern here is the validity or non-validity of an ordinance which leaves to the uncontrolled official discretion of the chief of police of a municipal corporation to say who shall, and who shall not, be accorded the privilege of parading on its public streets. No standard of regulation is even remotely suggested. Moreover, under the ordinance as drawn, the chief of police may for any reason which he may entertain arbitrarily deny this privilege to any group. This is authorization of the exercise of arbitrary power by a governmental agency which violates the Fourteenth Amendment. People vs. Harris, 104 Colo., 386, 394; 91 P. [2d], 989; 122 A.L.R. 1034. Such an ordinance is unreasonable and void on its face. City of Chicago vs. Troter, 136 Ill., 430; 26 N. E., 359. See, also, Anderson vs. City of Wellington, 40 Kan. 173; 19 P., 719; 2 L.R.A., 110; 10 Am. St. Rep., 175; State ex rel. vs. Dering, 84 Wis., 585; 54 N. W., 1104; 19 L. R. A., 858, 36 Am. St. Rep., 948; Anderson vs. Tedford, 80 Fla., 376; 85 So., 673; 10 A. L. R., 1481; State vs. Coleman, 96 Conn., 190; 113 A. 385, 387; 43 C. J., p. 419, section 549; 44 C. J., p. 1036, section 3885. * * *

"In the instant case the uncontrolled official suppression of the privilege of using the public streets in a lawful manner clearly is apparent from the face of the ordinance before us, and we therefore hold it null and void."

The Supreme Court of the United States in Hague vs. Committee for Industrial Organization, 307 U. S., 496, 515, 516; 83 Law. ed., 1423, declared that a municipal ordinance requiring the obtaining of a permit for a public assembly in or upon the public streets, highways, public parks, or public buildings of the city and authorizing the director of public safety, for the purpose of preventing riots, disturbances, or disorderly assemblage, to refuse to issue a permit when after investigation of all the facts and circumstances pertinent to the application he believes it to be proper to refuse to issue a permit, is not a valid exercise of the police power. Said Court in the course of its opinion in support of the conclusion said:

"* * * Wherever the title of streets and parks may rest, they have immemorially been held in trust for the use of the public and, time out of mind, have been used for purposes of assembly, communicating thoughts between citizens, and discussing public questions. Such use of the streets and public places has, from ancient times, been a part of the privileges, immunities, rights, and liberties of citizens. The privilege of a citizen of the United States to use the streets and parks for communication of views on national questions may be regulated in the interest of all; it is not absolute, but relative, and must be exercised in subordination to the general comfort and convenience, and in consonance with peace and good order; but it must not, in the guise of regulation, be abridged or denied.

"We think the court below was right in holding the ordinance quoted in Note 1 void upon its face. It does not make comfort or convenience in the use of streets or parks the standard of official action. It enables the Director of Safety to refuse a permit on his mere opinion that such refusal will prevent 'riots, disturbances or disorderly assemblage.' It can thus, as the record discloses, be made the instrument of arbitrary suppression of free expression of views on national affairs for the prohibition of all speaking will undoubtedly 'prevent' such eventualities. But uncontrolled official suppression of the privilege cannot be made a substitute for the duty to maintain order in connection with the exercise of the right."

Section 2434 of the Administrative Code, a part of the Charter of the City of Manila, which provides that the Mayor shall have the power to grant and refuse municipal licenses or permits of all classes, cannot be cited as an authority for the Mayor to deny the application of the petitioner, for the simple reason that said general power is predicated upon the ordinances enacted by the Municipal Board requiring licenses or permits to be issued by the Mayor, such as those found in Chapters 40 to 87 of the Revised Ordinances of the City of Manila. It is not a specific or substantive power independent from the corresponding municipal ordinances which the Mayor, as Chief Executive of the City, is required to enforce under the same section 2434. Moreover "one of the settled maxims in constitutional law is that the power conferred upon the Legislature to make laws cannot be delegated by that department to any other body or authority," except certain powers of local government, specially of police regulation which are conferred upon the legislative body of a municipal corporation. Taking this into consideration, and that the police power to regulate the use of streets and other public places has been delegated or rather conferred by the Legislature upon the Municipal Board of the City (section 2444 [u] of the Administrative Code) it is to be presumed that the Legislature has not, in the same breath, conferred upon the Mayor in section 2434 (m) the same power, specially if we take into account that its exercise may be in conflict with the exercise of the same power by the Municipal Board.

Besides, assuming arguendo that the Legislature has the power to confer, and in fact has conferred, upon the Mayor the power to grant or refuse licenses and permits of all classes, independent from ordinances enacted by the Municipal Board on the matter, and the provisions of section 2444 (u) of the same Code and of section 1119 of the Revised Ordinances to the contrary notwithstanding, such grant of unregulated and unlimited power to grant or refuse a permit for the use of streets and other public places for processions, parades, or meetings, would be null and void, for the same reasons stated in the decisions in the cases above quoted, specially in Willis Cox vs. New Hampshire, supra, wherein the question involved was also the validity of a similar statute of New Hamsphire. Because the same constitutional limitations applicable to ordinances apply to statutes, and the same objections to a municipal ordinance which grants unrestrained discretion upon a city officer are applicable to a law or statute that confers unlimited power to any officer either of the municipal or state governments. Under our democratic system of government no such unlimited power may be validly granted to any officer of the government, except perhaps in cases of national emergency. As stated in State ex rel. Garrabad vs. Dering, supra, "The discretion with which the council is vested is a legal discretion to be exercised within the limits of the law, and not a discretion to transcend it or to confer upon any city officer an arbitrary authority making in its exercise a petty tyrant."

It is true that Mr. Justice Ostrand cited said provision of article 2434 (m) of the Administrative Code apparently in support of the decision in the case of Evangelista vs. Earnshaw, 57 Phil., 255-261, but evidently the quotation of said provision was made by the writer of the decision under a mistaken conception of its purview and is an obiter dictum, for it was not necessary for the decision rendered. The popular meeting or assemblage intended to be held therein by the Communist Party of the Philippines was clearly an unlawful one, and therefore the Mayor of the City of Manila had no power to grant the permit applied for. On the contrary, had the meeting been held, it was his duty to have the promoters thereof prosecuted for violation of section 844, which is punishable as misdemeanor by section 1262 of the Revised Ordinances of the City of Manila. For, according to the decision, "the doctrine and principles advocated and urged in the Constitution and by-laws of the said Communist Party of the Philippines, and the speeches uttered, delivered, and made by its members in the public meetings or gatherings, as above stated, are highly seditious, in that they suggest and incite rebelious conspiracies and disturb and obstruct the lawful authorities in their duty."

The reason alleged by the respondent in his defense for refusing the permit is, "that there is a reasonable ground to believe, basing upon previous utterances and upon the fact that passions, specially on the part of the losing groups; remains bitter and high, that similar speeches will be delivered tending to undermine the faith and confidence of the people in their government, and in the duly constituted authorities, which might threaten breaches of the peace and a disruption of public order." As the request of the petition was for a permit "to hold a peaceful public meeting," and there is no denial of that fact or any doubt that it was to be a lawful assemblage, the reason given for the refusal of the permit can not be given any consideration. As stated in the portion of the decision in Hague vs. Committee on Industrial Organization, supra, "It does not make comfort and convenience in the use of streets or parks the standard of official action. It enables the Director of Safety to refuse the permit on his mere opinion that such refusal will prevent riots, disturbances or disorderly assemblage. It can thus, as the record discloses, be made the instrument of arbitrary suppression of free expression of views on national affairs, for the prohibition of all speaking will undoubtedly 'prevent' such eventualities." To this we may add the following, which we make our own, said by Mr. Justice Brandeis in his concurring opinion in Whitney vs. California, 71 U. S. (Law. ed.), 1105-1107:

"Fear of serious injury cannot alone justify suppression of free speech and assembly. Men feared witches and burned women. It is the function of speech to free men from the bondage of irrational fears. To justify suppression of free speech there must be reasonable ground to fear that serious evil will result if free speech is practiced. There must be reasonable ground to believe that the danger apprehended is imminent. There must be reasonable ground to believe that the evil to be prevented is a serious one * * *.

"Those who won our independence by revolution were not cowards. They did not fear political change. They did not exalt order at the cost of liberty. * * *

"Moreover, even imminent danger cannot justify resort to prohibition of these functions essential effective democracy, unless the evil apprehended is relatively serious. Prohibition of free speech and assembly is a measure so stringent that it would be inappropriate as the means for averting a relatively trivial harm to a society. * * * The fact that speech is likely to result in some violence or in destruction of property is not enough to justify its suppression. There must be the probability of serious injury to the state. Among freemen, the deterrents ordinarily to be applied to prevent crimes are education and punishment for violations of the law, not abridgment of the rights of free speech and assembly." Whitney vs. California, U. S. Sup. Ct. Rep., 71 Law., ed., pp. 1106-1107.)

In view of all the foregoing, the petition for mandamus is granted and, there appearing no reasonable objection to the use of the Plaza Miranda, Quiapo, for the meeting applied for, the respondent is ordered to issue the corresponding permit, as requested. So ordered.

Moran, C.J., Pablo, Perfecto, Bengzon, and Briones, JJ., concur.



CONCURRING OPINION

PARAS, J.:

The subject-matter of the petition is not new in this jurisdiction. Under Act No. 2774, section 4, amending section 2434, paragraph (m) of the Revised Administrative Code, the Mayor has discretion to grant or deny the petition to hold the meeting. (See Evangelista vs. Earnshaw, 57 Phil., 255.) And, in the case of U. S. vs. Apurado, 7 Phil., 422, 426, this Court said:

"It is rather to be expected that more or less disorder will mark the public assembly of the people to protest against grievances whether real or imaginary, because on such occasions feeling is always wrought to a high pitch of excitement, and the greater the grievance and the more intense the feeling, the less perfect, as a rule, will be the disciplinary control of the leaders over their irresponsible followers. But if the prosecution be permitted to seize upon every instance of such disorderly conduct by individual members of a crowd as an excuse to characterize the assembly as a seditious and tumultuous rising against the authorities, then the right to assemble and to petition for redress of grievances would become a delusion and snare and the attempt to exercise it on the most righteous occasion and in the most peaceable manner would expose all those who took part therein to the severest and most unmerited punishment, if the purposes which they sought to attain did not happen to be pleasing to the prosecuting authorities. If instances of disorderly conduct occur on such occasions, the guilty individuals should be sought out and punished therefor."

The petitioner is a distinguished member of the bar and Floor Leader of the Nacionalista Party in the House of Representatives; he was the chief campaigner of the said party in the last elections. As the petition comes from a responsible party, in contrast to Evangelista's Communist Party which was considered subversive, I believe that the fear which caused the Mayor to deny it was not well founded and his action was accordingly far from being a sound exercise of his discretion.



BRIONES, M., conforme:

En nombre del Partido Nacionalista y de los grupos oposicionistas aliados, Cipriano P. Primicias, director general de campaña de las minorias coaligadas en las ultimas elecciones y "Floor Leader" de dichas minorias en la Camara de Representantes, solicito del Alcalde de Manila en comunicacion de fecha 14 de Noviembre, 1947, permiso "para celebrar un mitin publico en la Plaza Miranda el Domingo, 16 de Noviembre, 1947, desde las 5:00 p.m. hasta la 1:00 a.m., a fin de pedir al gobierno el remedio de ciertos agravios." Tambien se pedia en la comunicacion licencia para usar la plataforma ya levantada en dicha Plaza.

El Vice-Alcalde Cesar Miraflor actuo sobre la solicitud en aquel mismo dia dando permiso tanto para la celebracion del mitin como para el uso de la plataforma, "en la inteligencia de que no se pronunciaran discursos subversivos, y ademas, de que usted (el solicitante) sera responsable del mantenimiento de la paz y orden durante la celebracion del mitin."

Sin embargo, al dia siguiente, 15 de Noviembre, el Alcalde Valeriano E. Fugoso revoco el permiso concedido, expresandose los motivos de la revocacion en su carta de tal fecha dirigida al Rep. Primicias.

"Sirvase dar por informado dice el Alcalde Fugoso en su carta que despues de haber leido los periodicos metropolitanos de esta mañana en que aparece que vuestro mitin va a ser un 'rally' de indignacion en donde se denunciaran ante el pueblo los supuestos fraudes electorates perpetrados en varias partes de Filipinas para anular la voluntad popular, por la presente se revoca dicho permiso.

"Se cree añade el Alcalde que la paz y el orden en Manila sufriran daño en dicho 'rally' considerando que las pasiones todavia no se han calmado y la tension sigue alta como resultado de la ultima contienda politica.

"Segun los mismos periodicos, delegados venidos de provincias y estudiantes de las universidades locales participaran en el 'rally,' lo cual, a mi juicio, no haria mas que causar disturbios, pues no se puede asegurar que concurriran alli solamente elementos de la oposicion. Desde el momento en que se mezclen entre la multitud gentes de diferentes matices politicos, que es lo que probablemente va a ocurrir, el orden queda en peligro una vez que al publico se le excite, como creo que sera excitado, teniendo en cuenta los fines del mitin tal como han sido anunciados en los periodicos mencionados.

"Se dice que los resultados de las ultimas elecciones seran protestados. No hay base para este proceder toda vez que los resultados todavia no han sido oficialmente anunciados.

"Por tanto termina el Alcalde su orden revocatoria la accion de esta oficina se toma en interes del orden publico y para prevenir la perturbacion de la paz en Manila."

De ahi el presente recurso de mandamus para que se ordene al Alcalde recurrido a que expida inmediatamente el permiso solicitado. Se pide tambien que ordenemos al Procurador General para que investigue la fase criminal del caso y formule la accion que justifiquen las circunstancias.

Dada la premura del asunto, se llamo inmediatamente a vista arguyendo extensamente los abogados de ambas partes ante esta Corte en sus informes orales.[1]

El recurso se funda, respecto de su aspecto civil, en el articulo III, seccion 1, inciso 8 de la Constitucion de Filipinas, el cual preceptua "que no se aprobara ninguna ley que coarte la libertad de la palabra, o de la prensa, o el derecho del pueblo de reunirse pacificamente y dirigir petiticiones al gobierno para remedio de sus agravios." Con respecto al posible aspecto criminal del caso se invoca el articulo 131 del Codigo Penal Revisado, el cual dispone que "la pena de prision correccional en su periodo minimo, se impondra al funcionario publico o empleado que, sin fundamento legal, prohibiere o interrumpiere una reunion pacifica, o disolviere la misma."

La defensa del recurrido invoca a su favor los llamados poderes de policia que le asisten como guardian legal de las plazas, calles y demas lugares publicos. Se alega que como Alcalde de la Ciudad de Manila tiene plena discrecion para conceder o denegar el uso de la Plaza Miranda, que es una plaza publica, para la celebracion de un mitin o reunion, de conformidad con las exigencias del interes general tal como el las interpreta. Especificamente se citan dos disposiciones, a saber : el articulo 2434 (b), inciso (m) del Codigo Administrativo Revisado, y el articulo 1119, capitulo 118 de la Compilacion de las Ordenanzas Revisadas de la Ciudad de Manila, edicion de 1927. El articulo aludido del Codigo Administrativo Revisado se lee como sigue:

* * * * * *

"(m) To grant and refuse municipal license or permits of all classes and to revoke the same for violation of the conditions upon which they were granted, or if acts prohibited by law or municipal ordinance are being committed under the protection of such licenses or in the premises in which the business for which the same have been granted is carried on, or for any other good reason of general interest."

La ordenanza municipal indicada reza lo siguiente:

"SEC. 1119. Free for use of public. The streets and public places of the city shall be kept free and clear for the use of the public, and the sidewalks and crossings for the pedestrians, and the same shall only be used or occupied for other purposes as provided by the ordinance or regulation: Provided, That the holding of athletic games, sports, or exercises during the celebration of national holidays in any streets or public places of the city and on the patron saint day of any district in question, may be permitted by means of a permit issued by the Mayor, who shall determine the streets or public places, or portions thereof, where such athletic games, sports, or exercises may be held: And provided, further, That the holding of any parade or procession in any streets or public places is prohibited unless a permit therefor is first secured from the Mayor, who shall, on every occasion, determine or specify the streets or public places for the formation, route, and dismissal of such parade or procession: And provided, finally, That all applications to hold a parade or procession shall be submitted to the Mayor not less than twenty-four hours prior to the holding of such parade or procession."

Parece conveniente poner en claro ciertos hechos. El mitin o "rally" de indignacion de que habla el Alcalde recurrido en su carta revocando el permiso ya concedido no consta en la peticion del recurrente ni en ningun documenmento o manifestacion verbal atribuida al mismo, sino solamente en las columnas informativas de la prensa metropolitana. El recurrente admite, sin embargo, que el objeto del mitin era comunicar al pueblo la infinidad de telegramas y comunicadones que como jefe de campaña de las oposiciones habia recibido de varias partes del archipielago denunciando tremendas anomalias, escandalosos fraudes, actos vandalicos de terrorismo politico, etc., etc., ocurridos en las elecciones de 11 de Noviembre; llamar la atencion del Gobierno hacia tales anomalias y abusos; y pedir su pronta, eficaz y honrada intervencion para evitar lo que todavia se podia evitar, y con relacion a los hechos consumados urgir la pronta persecucion y castigo inmediato de los culpables y malhechores. De esto resulta evidente que el objeto del mitin era completamente pacifico, absolutamente legal. No hay ni la menor insinuacion de que el recurrente y los partidos oposicionistas coaligados que representa tuvieran el proposito de utilizer el mitin para derribar violentamente al presente gobierno, o provocar una rebelion o siquiera un motin. En realidad, teniendo en cuenta las serias responsabilidades del recurrente como jefe de campaña electoral de las minorias aliadas y como "Floor Leader" en el Congreso de dichas minorias, parecia que esta consideracion debia pesar decisivamente en favor de la presuncion de que el mitin serfa una asamblea pacifica, de ciudadanos conscientes, responsables y amantes de la ley y del orden.[2]

Se ha llamado nuestra atencion a que en el articulo arriba citado y transcrito de las Ordenanzas Revisadas de Manila no figura el mitin entre las materias reglamentadas, sino solo la procesion o parada por las calles. Esto demuestra, se sostiene, que cuando se trata de un mitin en una plaza o lugar publico, la concesion del permiso es ineludible y el Alcalde no tiene ninguna facultad discrecional. Pareceme, sin embargo, que no es necesario llegar a este extremo. Creo no debe haber inconveniente en admitir que el mitin esta incluido en la reglamentacion, por razones de conveniencia publica. Verbigracia, es perfectamente licito denegar el permiso para celebrar un mitin en una plaza publica en un dia y una hora determinados cuando ya previamente se ha concedido de buena fe el uso del mismo lugar a otro a la misma hora. La prevencion de esta clase de conflictos es precisamente uno de los ingredientes que entran en la motivacion de la facultad reguladora del Estado o del municipio con relacion al uso de calles, plazas y demas lugares publicos. Por ejemplo, es tambien perfectamente licito condicionar el permiso atendiendo a su relacion con el movimiento general del trafico tanto de peatones como de vehiculos. Estas consideraciones de comfort y conveniencia publica son por lo regular la base, el leit-motif de toda ley u ordenanza encaminada a reglamentar el uso de parques, plazas y calles. Desde luego que la regla no excluye la consideracion a veces de la paz y del buen orden, pero mas adelante veremos que este ultimo, para que sea atendible, requiere que exista una situacion de peligro verdadero, positivo real, claro, inminente y substantial. La simple conjetura, la mera aprension, el temor mas o menos exagerado de que el mitin, asamblea o reunion pueda ser motivo de desorden o perturbacion de la paz no es motivo bastante para denegar el permiso, pues el derecho constitucional de reunirse pacificamente, ya para que los ciudadanos discutan los asuntos publicos o se comuniquen entre si su pensamiento sobre ellos, ya para ejecer el derecho de peticion recabando del gobierno el remedio a ciertos agravios, es infinitamente superior a toda facultad reguladora en relacion con el uso de los parques, plazas y calles.

La cuestion, por tanto, que tenemos que resolver en el presente recurso es bien sencilla. ¿Tenia razon el Alcalde recurrido para denegar el permiso solicitado por el recurrente, ora bajo los terminos de la ordenanza pertinente, ora bajo la carta organica de Manila, y sobre todo, bajo el precepto categorico, terminante, expresado en el inciso 8, section 1, del Articulo III de la Constitucion? ¿No constituye la denegacion del permiso una seria conculcacion de ciertos privilegios fundamentales garantizados por la Constitucion al ciudadano y al pueblo?

Resulta evidente, de autos, que el recurrido denego el permiso bajo lo que el mismo llama "all-pervading power of the state to regulate," temiendo que el mitin solicitado iba a poner en peligro la paz y el orden publico en Manila. No se fundo la denegacion en razones de "comfort" o conveniencia publica, vgr., para no estorbar el trafico, o para prevenir un conflicto con otro mitin ya previamente solicitado y concedido, sino en una simple conjetura, en un mero temor o aprension la aprension de que, dado el tremendo hervor de los animos resultante de una lucha electoral harto reñida y apasionada, un discurso violento, una arenga incendiaria podria amotinar a la gente y provocar serios desordenes. La cuestion en orden es la siguiente: ¿se puede anular o siquiera poner en suspenso el derecho fundamentalisimo de reunion o asamblea pacifica, garantizado por la Constitucion, por razon de esta clase de conjetura, temor o aprension? Es obvio que la contestacion tiene que ser decididamente negativa. Elevar tales motivos a la categoria de razon legal equivaldria practicamente a sancionar o legitimar cualquier pretexto, a colocar los privilegios y garantias constitucionales a merced del capricho y de la arbitrariedad. Si la vigencia de tales privilegios y garantias hubiera de depender de las suspicacias, temores, aprensiones, o hasta humor del gobernante, uno podria facilmente imaginar los resultados desastrosos de semejante proposicion; un partido mayoritario dirigido por caudillos y liders sin escrupulos y sin conciencia podria facilmente anular todas las libertades, atropellar todos los, derechos incluso los mas sagrados, ahogar todo movimiento legitimo de protesta o peticion, estrangular, en una palabra, a las minorias, las cuales como sabe todo estudiante de ciencia politica en el juego y equilibrio de fuerzas que integran el sistema democratico son tan indispensables como las mayorias. ¿Que es lo que todavia podria detener a un partido o a un hombre que estuviera en el poder y que no quisiera oir nada desagradable de sus adversarios si se le dejara abiertas las puertas para que, invocando probables peligros o amagos de peligro, pudiera de una sola plumada o de un solo gesto de repulsa anular o poner en suspenso los privilegios y garantias constitucionales? ¿No seria esto retornar a los dias de aquel famoso Rey que dijo: "El Estado soy yo," o de aquel notorio cabecilla politico de uno de los Estados del Sur de America que asombro al resto de su pais con este nefasto pronunciamiento: "I am the only Constitution around here"? Es inconcebible que la facultad de reglamentar o el llamado poder de policia deba interpretarse en el sentido de justificar y autorizar la anulacion de on derecho, privilegio o garantia constitucional. Sin embargo, tal seria el resultado si en nombre de un concepto tan vago y tan elastico como es el "interes general" se permitiera interdecir la libertad de la palabra, de la cual los derechos de reunion y de peticion son nada mas que complemento logico y necesario. Una mujer famosa de Francia[3] en la epoca del terror, momentos antes de subir al cadalso y colocar su hermoso cuello bajo la cuchilla de la guillotina, hizo historica esta exclamacion: "¡Libertad, cuantos crimenes se cometen en tu nombre!" Si se denegara el presente recurso legitimando la accion del recurrido y consiguientemente autorizando la supresion de los mitines so pretexto de que la paz y el orden publico corren peligro con ellos, un desengañado de la democracia en nuestro pais acaso exprese entonces su suprema desilusion parafraseando la historica exclamacion de la siguiente manera: "¡Interes general, paz, orden publico, cuantos atentados se cometen en vuestro nombre contra la libertad!"

El consenso general de las autoridades en los paises constitucionalmente regidos como Filipinas, particularmente en Estados Unidos, es que el privilegio del ciudadano de usar los parques, plazas y calles para el intercambio de impresiones y puntos de vista sobre cuestiones nacionales si bien es absoluto es tambien relativo en el sentido de que se puede regular, pero jamas se puede denegar o coartar so pretexto o a guisa de regulacion (Hague vs. Committee for Industrial Organization, 307 U. S., 515-517). Este asunto, planteado y decidido en 1938, ha venido a ser clasico en la jurisprudencia americana sobre casos del mismo tipo que el que nos ocupa. La formidable asociacion obrera Committee for Industrial Organization conocida mas popularmente por la famosa abreviatura CIO, planteo una queja ante los tribunales de New Jersey contra las autoridades de Jersey City, (a) atacando, por fundamentos constitucionales, la validez de una ordenanza municipal que regulaba y restringia el derecho de reunion; y (b) tachando de inconstitucionales los metodos y medios en virtud de los cuales ponian en vigor la ordenanza las referidas autoridades.

Los hechos del caso, brevemente expuestos, son, a saber : La CIO trataba de celebrar mitines y asambleas publicas en Jersey City a fin de comunicar a los ciudadanos sus puntos de Vista sobre la "National Labor Relations Act." Las autoridades de la ciudad, comenzando por el Alcalde Hague el famoso cabecilla de la muy notoria maquina politica de New Jersey, rehusaron consistentemente conceder licencia para dichos mitines bajo la especiosa alegacion de que los miembros de la organizacion obrera solicitante eran comunistas y del orden publico corria peligro de grave perturbacion; es decir, casi, casi la misma alegacion que en el presente caso. La denegacion de la licencia se fundaba en una ordenanza municipal que trataba de reglamentar el derecho constitucional de reunion y asamblea pacifica.

Los tribunales de New Jersey, declarando inconstitucionales la ordenanza en cuestion y los metodos por los cuales se trataba de poner en vigor, sentenciaron a favor de la CIO permitiendole celebrar los mitines solicitados. Elevado el asunto en casacion a la Corte Suprema Federal, esta confirmo la sentencia con solo una ligera modificacion. Entre otros pronunciamientos se dijo que: (a) donde quiera este alojado el titulo sobre las calles, parques y plazas, desde tiempo inmemorial los mismos siempre se han considerado como un fideicomiso para uso del publico, y desde tiempos remotos que la memoria no alcanza se han usado siempre para fines de reunion y de intercambio de impresiones y puntos de vista entre los ciudadanos, asi como para la libre discusion de los asuntos publicos; (b) que el uso de las calles y plazas publicas para tales fines ha sido siempre, desde la antiguedad, una parte importante y esencial de los privilegios, inmunidades, derechos y libertades de los ciudadanos; (c) que el privilegio del ciudadano de los Estados Unidos de usar las calles, plazas y parques para la comunicacion de impresiones y puntos de vista sobre cuestiones nacionales puede ser regulado en interes de todos; es en tal sentido absoluto pero relativo, y debe ser ejercitado con sujecion al "comfort" y conveniencia generales y en consonancia con la paz y el buen orden; pero no puede ser coartado o denegado so pretexto y forma de regulacion; (d) que el tribunal inferior estuvo acertado al declarar invalida la ordenanza en su faz, pues no hace del "comfort" o conveniencia en el uso de calles y plazas la norma y patron de la accion oficial; por el contrario, faculta al Director de Seguridad a rehusar el permiso en virtud de su simple opinion de que la denegacion es para prevenir motines, trastornos o reuniones turbulentas y desordenadas; (e) que, de esta manera, y conforme lo demuestra el record, la denegacion puede ser utilizada como instrumento para la supresion arbitraria de la libre expression de opiniones sobre asuntos nacionales, pues la prohibicion de hablar producira indudablemente tal efecto: (f) y, por ultimo, que no puede echarse mano de la supresion oficial del privilegio para ahorrarse el trabajo y el deber de mantener el orden en relacion con el ejercicio del derecho. En otras palabras, traduciendo literalmente la fraseologia de la sentencia, aun a riesgo de incurrir en un anglicismo, "no puede hacerse de la supresion oficial incontrolada del privilegio un sustituto del deber de mantener el orden en relacion con el ejercicio del derecho." He aqui ad verbatim la doctrina:

"5. Regulation of parks and streets. "Wherever the title of streets and parks may rest, they have immemorially been held in trust for the use of the public and, time out of mind, have been used for purposes of assembly, communicating thoughts between citizens, and discussing public questions. Such use of the streets and public places has, from ancient times, been a part of the privileges, immunities, rights, and liberties of citizens. The privilege of the citizen of the United States to use the streets and parks for communication of views on national questions may be regulated in the interest of all; it is not absolute, but relative, and must be exercised in subordination to the general comfort and convenience and in consonance with peace and good order; but it must not in the guise of regulation be abridged or denied. We think the court below was right in holding the ordinance * * * void upon its face. It does not make comfort or convenience in the use of streets or parks the standard of official action. It enables the Director of Safety to refuse a permit on his mere opinion that such refusal will prevent riots, disturbances, or disorderly assemblage. It can thus, as the record discloses, be made the instrument of arbitrary suppression of free expression of views on national affairs for the prohibition of all speaking will undoubtedly 'prevent' such eventualities. But uncontrolled official suppression of the privilege cannot be made a substitute for the duty to maintain order in connection with the exercise of the right." (Hague vs. Committee for Industrial Organization, 307 U. S. 496, 515-516.)

Durante la audiencia del presente asunto se hizo mencion del caso de Evangelista contra Earnshaw, 57 Jur. Fil., 255, como un precedente en apoyo de la accion del Alcalde recurrido. Pero la similitud es solo en el hecho de que el entonces Alcalde D. Tomas Earnshaw tambien revoco el permiso previamente concedido al partido comunista que representaba Crisanto Evangelista para celebrar mitines en Manila, pero las circunstancias en ambos casos son enteramente diferentes. El Alcalde Earnshaw revoco el permiso despues de una minuciosa investigacion en que se habian encontrado pruebas indubitables no solo de que en los estatutos y documentos del partido comunista se preconizaba como uno de sus primordiales objetivos el derribar al gobierno americano en Filipinas gobierno que ellos calificaban de imperialista y capitalistico sino que de hecho en mitines celebrados con anterioridad los comunistas habian pronunciado discursos clara y positivamente sediciosos predicando una abierta rebelion e incitando un alzamiento para liberar, segun ellos, al proletariado filipino de las garras del imperialismo capitalista. La accion, por tanto, del Alcalde Earnshaw se fundo no en una simple conjetura, en un mero temor o aprension, sino en la existencia de un peligro inminente, claro, real, sustantivo ingrediente unico y excepcionalisimo que permite una salvedad suspensiva singularisima en el ejercicio de los privilegios constitucionales de que se trata.

¿Existe ese ingrediente en el caso que nos ocupa? Indudablemente que no. Ni siquiera se ha hecho la mas pequeña insinuacion de que las minorias coaligadas en cuyo nombre se ha pedido la celebracion del mitin en cuestion tuvieran el proposito de derribar al gobierno por metodos y procedimientos violentos. El mismo Fiscal Villamor, en su informe oral, admitio francamente la legalidad de la coalicion y de sus fines. Podemos tomar conocimiento judicial de que esas minorias coaligadas lucharon en todas las provincias y municipios de Filipinas presentando candidatos para todos los cargos nacionales, provinciales y locales, y de que su candidatura senatorial triunfo en 21 provincias de las 50 que componen el mapa electoral, y en 5 ciudades con carta especial de las 8 que existen, incluyendose entre dichas 5 la de Manila, capital del archipielago.

Que la coalicion minoritaria no es una organizacion subversiva como la que fue proscripta en el caso de Evangelista contra Earnshaw, sino que por el contrario propugna la balota, no la bala, como el instrumento normal y democratico para cambiar los gobiernos y las administraciones, lo demuestra, ademas del hecho ya apuntado de que lucho en las ultimas elecciones prevaliendose de las armas proveidas por la legalidad y sacando partido de los medios de que disponia frente a la natural superioridad del partido gobernante, lo demuestra, repito, la circunstancia de que despues de hechas las votaciones y mientras se estaban contando los votos y cuando vio que, segun ella, se habia escamoteado o se estaba escamoteando la voluntad popular en varias partes mediante engaños, abusos y anomalias de diferentes clases, no busco la violencia ni recurrio a la accion directa para hallar remedio a sus agravios o vengarlos, sino que trato de cobijarse bajo la Constitucion reuniendo al pueblo en asamblea magna al aire libre para comunicar y discutir sus quejas y recabar del gobierno el correspondiente remedio. Y esto lo hizo la coalicion oficialmente, con todas las rubricas del protocolo, formulando la petition del mitin el hombre que mejor podia representarla y ofrecer garantias de legalidad y orden ante los poderes constituidos el recurrente en este caso, cuya solvencia moral y politica esta doblemente garantida por su condicion de lider de las minorias en el Congreso y jefe de campaña de las mismas en las pasadas elecciones. ¿Que mejor prueba de legalidad y de propositos pacificos y ordenados?

Por tanto, las circunstancias han venido a situar al gobierno en una encrucijada : por un lado, el camino angosto de la represion, de una politica de fuerza y de cordon ferreo policiaco; por otro lado, la amplia avenida de la libertad, una politica que consista en abrir espitas y valvulas por donde pueda extravasarse no ya la protesta sino inclusive la indignacion del pueblo, previniendo de esta manera que los vapores mal reprimidos hagan estallar la caldera, o que la desesperacion lo arrastre a conspirar en la sombra o a confiar su suerte a los azares de una cruenta discordia civil. Creo que entre ambas politicas la eleccion no es dudosa.

Se alega que antes del 11 de Noviembre, dia de las elecciones, el Alcalde recurrido habia concedido a las minorias coaligadas permisos para celebrar varios mitines politicos en diferentes sitios de Manila; que en dichos mitines se habian pronunciado discursos altamente inflamatorios y calumniosos llamandose ladrones y chanchulleros a varios funcionarios del gobierno nacional y de la Ciudad de Manila, entre ellos el Presidente de Filipinas, el Presidente del Senado y el mismo recurrido, suscitandose contra ellos la animadversion y el desprecio del pueblo mediante la acusacion de que han estado malversando propiedades y fondos publicos con grave detrimento del bienestar e interes generales ; que, dado este antecedente, habia motivo razonable para creer que semejantes discursos se pronunciarian de nuevo, minandose de tal manera la fe y la confianza del pueblo en su gobierno y exponiendose consiguientemente la paz y el orden a serias perturbaciones, teniendo en cuenta la temperatura elevadisima de las pasiones, sobre todo de parte de los grupos perdidosos y derrotados.

Estas alegaciones son evidentemente insostenibles. Darles les valor equivaldria a instituir aqui un regimen de previa censura, el cual no solo es extraño sino que es enteramente repulsivo e incompatible con nuestro sistema de gobierno. Nuestro sistema, mas que de prevencion, es de represion y castigo sobre la base de los hechos consumados. En otras palabras, es un sistema que permite el amplio juego de la libertad, exigiendo, sin embargo, estricta cuenta al que abusase de ella. Este es el espiritu que informa nuestras leyes que castigan criminalmente la calumnia, la difamacion oral y escrita, y otros delitos semejantes. Y parafraseando lo dicho en el citado asunto de Hague vs. Committee for Industrial Organization, la supresion incontrolada del privilegio constitutional no puede utilizarse como sustituto de la operacion de dichas leyes.

Se temia dice el recurrido en su contestation que la probable virulencia de los discursos y la fuerte tension de los animos pudiesen alterar seriamente la paz y el orden publico. Pero cabe preguntar ¿de cuando aca la libertad, la democracia no ha sido un peligro, y un peligro perpetuo? En realidad, de todas las formas de gobierno la democracia no solo es la mas dificil y compleja, sino que es la mas peligrosa. Rizal tiene en uno de sus libros inmortales una hermosa imagen que es perfectamente aplicable a la democracia. Puede decirse que esta es como la mar: serena, inmovil, sin siquiera ningun rizo que arrugue su superficie, cuando no lo agita ningun viento. Pero cuando sopla el huracan lease, Vientos de la Libertad sus aguas se alborotan, sus olas se encrespan, y entonces resulta horrible, espantosa, con la espantabilidad de las fuerzas elementales que se desencadenan liberrimamente.

¿Ha dejado, sin embargo, el hombre de cruzar los mares tan solo porque pueden encresparse y enfurecerse a veces? Pues bien; lo mismo puede decirse de la democracia: hay que tomarla con todos sus inconvenientes, con todos sus peligros. Los que temen la libertad no merecen vivirla. La democracia no es para pusilanimes. Menos cuando de la pusilanimidad se hace pretexto para imponer un regimen de fuerza fundado en el miedo. Porque entonces el absolutismo se disfraza bajo la careta odiosa de la hipocresia. Ejemplo: los Zares de Rusia. Y ya se sabe como terminaron.

El Magistrado Sr. Carson describio con mano maestra los peligros de la libertad y democracia y previno el temor a ellos con las luminosas observaciones que se transcriben a continuacion, expuestas en la causa de Estados Unidos contra Apurado, 7 Jur. Fil., 440 (1907), a saber:

"Es de esperar que haya mas o menos desorden en una reunion publica del pueblo para protestar contra agravios ya sean reales o imaginarios porque en esos casos los animos siempre estan excesivamente exaltados, y mientras mayor sea el agravio y mas intenso el resentimiento, tanto menos perfecto sera por regla general el control disciplinario de los directores sobre sus secuaces irresponsables. Pero si se permitiese al ministerio fiscal agarrarse de cada acto aislado de desorden cometido por individuos o miembros de una multitud como pretexto para caracterizar la reunion como un levantamiento sedicioso y tumultuoso contra las autoridades, entonces el derecho de asociacion, y de pedir reparacion de agravios seria completamente ilusorio, y el ejercicio de ese derecho en la ocasion mas propia y en la forma mas pacifica expondria a todos los que tomaron parte en ella, al mas severo e inmerecido castigo si los fines que perseguian no fueron del agrado de los representantes del ministerio fiscal. Si en tales asociaciones ocurren casos de desorden debe averiguarse quienes son los culpables y castigarseles por este motivo, pero debe procederse con la mayor discrecion al trazar la linea divisoria entre el desorden y la sedicion, y entre la reunion esencialmente pacifica y un levantamiento tumultuoso."

En el curso de los informes se pregunto al Fiscal, defensor del recurrido, si con motivo de los discursos que se dicen calumniosos y difamatorios pronunciados en los mitines de la oposicion antes de las elecciones ocurrio algun serio desorden: la contestacion fue negativa. Como se dice mas arriba, en el mitin monstruo que despues se celebro en virtud de nuestra decision en el presente asunto tampoco ocurrio nada. ¿Que demuestra esto? Que los temores eran exagerados, por no llamarlos fantasticos; que el pueblo de Manila, con su cordura, tolerancia y amplitud de criterio, probo ser superior a las aprensiones, temores y suspicacias de sus gobernantes.

La democracia filipina no puede ni debe sufrir un retroceso en la celosa observancia de las garantias constitucionales sobre la libertad de la palabra y los derechos concomitantes el de reunion y peticion. Se trata de derechos demasiado sagrados, harto metidos en el Corazon y alma de nuestro pueblo para ser tratados negligentemente, con un simple encogimiento de hombres. Fueron esas libertades las que inspiraron a nuestros antepasados en sus luchas contra la opresion y el despotismo. Fueron esas libertades la base del programa politico de los laborantes precursors del'96. Fueron esas libertades las que cristalizaron en la carta organizacional de Bonifacio, generando luego el famoso Grito de Balintawak. Fueron esas libertades las que despues informaron los documentos politicos de Mabini y la celebre Constitucion de Malolos. Y luego, durante cerca de medio siglo de colaboracion Filipino-americana, fueron esas mismas libertades la esencia de nuestras instituciones, la espina dorsal del regimen constitucional y practicamente republican aqui establecido. Nada major, creo yo, para historiar el proceso de esas libertades que los atinados y elocuentes pronunciamentos del Magistrado Sr. Malcolm en la causa de Estados Unidos contra Bustos, 37 Jur. Fil., 764 (1918). Es dificil mejorarlos; asi que opto por transcribirlos ad verbatim a continuacion:

"Hojeando las paginas de la historia, no decimos nada Nuevo al afirmar que la libertad de la palabra, tal y como la han defendido siempre todos los paises democraticos, era desconocida en las Islas Filipinas antes de 1900. Por tanto, existia latente la principal causa de la revolucion. Jose Rizal en su obra 'Filipinas Dentro de Cien Años' (paginas 62 y siguientes) describiendo 'las reformas sine quibus non,' en que insistian los Filipinos, dijo:

"El ministro, * * * que quiera que sus reformas sean reformas, debe principiar por declarer la prensa libre en Filipinas, y por crear diputados Filipinos.

"Los patriotas Filipinos que estaban en España, por medio de las columnas de La Solidaridad y por otros medios, al exponer los deseos del Pueblo Filipino, pidieron invariablemente la 'libertad de prensa, de cultos y de asociacion.' (Vease Mabini, 'La Revolucion Filipina.') La Constitucion de Malolos, obra del Congreso Revolucionario, en su Bill de Derechos, garantizaba celosamente la libertad de la palabra y de la prensa y los derechos de reunion y de peticion.

"Tan solo se mencionan los datos que anteceden para deducir la afirmacion de que una reforma tan sagrada para el pueblo de estas Islas y a tan alto precio conseguida, debe ampararse ahora y llevares adelante en la misma forma en que se ptrotegeria y defenderia el derecho a la libertad.

"Depues sigue el period de la mutual colaboracion americano-filipina. La Constitucion de los Estados Unidos y las de los diversos Estads de la Union garantizan el derecho de la libertad y de la palabra y de la prensa y los derechos de reunion y de peticion. Por lo tanto, no nos sorprende encontrar consignadas en la Carta Magna de la Libertad Filipina del Presidente McKinley, sus Instrucciones a la Segunda Comision de Filipinas, de 7 de abril de 1900, que sientan el siguiente inviolabla principio:

"Que no se aprobara ninguna ley que coarte la libertad de la palabra o de la prensa o de los derechos del pueblo para reunirse pacificamente y dirigir peticiones al Gobierno para remedio de sus agravios."

"El Bill de Filipinas, o sea la Ley del Congreso de 1.° de Julio de 1902, y la Ley Jones, o sea la Ley del Congreso de 29 de Agosto de 1916, que por su naturaleza son leyes organicas de las Islas Filipinas, siguen otorgando esta garatia. Las palabras ente comillas no son extrañas para los estudiantes de derecho constitucional, porque estan calcadas de la Primera Enmienda a la Constitucion de los Estados Unidos que el pueblo Americano pidio antes de otorgar su aprobacion a la Constitucion.

"Mencionamos los hechos expuestos tan solo para deducir la afirmacion, que no debe olvidarse por un solo instante, de que las mencionadas garantias constituyen parte integrante de la Ley Organica La Constitucion de las Islas Filipinas.

"Estos parrafos que figuran insertos en el Bill de Derechos de Filipinas no son una huera palabreria. Las palabras que alli se emplean llevan consigno toda la jurisprudencia que es de aplicacion a los grandes casos constitucionales de Inglaterra y America. (Kepner vs. U.S. [1904], 195 U.S., 100; Serra vs. Mortiga [1917], 214 U.S., 470.) Y ¿cuales son estos principios? Volumen tras volume no bastaria a dar una contestacion adecuada. Pero entre aquellos estan los siguentes:

"Los intereses de la sociedad y la conservacion de un buen gobierno requiren una discussion plena de los asuntos publicos. Completa libertad de comentar los actos de los funcionarios publicos viene a ser un escalpelo cuando se trata de la libertad de la palabra. La penetrante incision de la tinta libra a la burocracia del absceso. Los hombres que se dedican a la vida publica podran ser victimas de una acusacion injusta y hostil; pero podra calmarse la herida con el balsam que proporciona una conciencia tranquila. El funcionario public no debe ser demasiado quisquilloso con respeto a los comentarios de sus actos oficiales. Tan solo en esta forma puede exaltarse la mente y la dignidad de los individuos. Desde luego que la critica no debe autorizar la difamacion. Con todo, como el individuo es menos que el Estado, debe esperarse que sobrelleve la critica en beneficio de la comunidad. Elevandose a mayor altura que todos los funcionarios o clases de funcionarios, que el Jefe Ejecutivo, que la Legislatura, que el Poder Judicial que cualesquiera o sobre todas las dependencias del Gobierno la opinion publica debe ser el constante manantial de la libertad y de la democracia. (Veanse los casos perfectamete estudiados do Wason vs. Walter, L. R. 4 Q. B., 73, Seymour vs. Butterworth, 3 F. & F., 372; The Queen vs. Sir R. Carden, 5 Q. B. D., 1.)

Ahora que ya somos independientes es obvio que la republica no solo no ha de ser menos celosa que la antigua colonia en la tenencia y conservacion de esas libertades, sino que, por el contrario, tiene que ser muchisimo mas activa y militante. Obrar de otra manera seria como borrar de una plumada nuestras mas preciosas conquistas en las jornadas mas brillantes de nuestra historia. Seria como renegar de lo mejor de nuestro pasado: Rizal, Marcelo H. del Pilar, Bonifacio, Mabini, Quezon, y otros padres inmortales de la patria. Seria, en una palabra, como si de un golpe catastrofico se echara abajo la recia fabrica de la democracia filipina que tanta sangre y tantos sacrificios ha costado a nuestro pueblo, y en su lugar se erigiera el tinglado de una dictadura de opera bufa, al amparo de caciquillos y despotillas que pondrian en ridiculo el pais ante el mundo * * * Es evidente que no hemos llegado a estas alturas, en la trabajosa ascension hacia la cumbre de nuestros destinos, para permitir que ocurra esa tragedia.

No nos compete determinar el grado de certeza de los fraudes e irregularidades electorales que la coalicion minoritaria trataba de airear en el mitin en cuestion con vistas a recabar del gobierno y del pueblo el propio y correspondiente remedio. Pudieran ser reales o pudieran ser imaginarios, en todo o en parte. Pero de una cosa estamos absolutamente seguros y es que la democracia no puede sobrevivir a menos que este fundada sobre la base de un sufragio efectivo, sincero, libre, limpio y ordenado. El colegio electoral es el castillo, mejor todavia, el baluarte de la democracia. Suprimid eso, y la democracia resulta una farsa.

Asi que todo lo que tienda a establecer un sufragio efectivo[4] no solo no debe ser reprimido, sino que debe ser alentado. Y para esto, en general para la salud de la republica, no hay mejor profilaxis, no hay mejor higiene que la critica libre, la censura desembarazada. Solamente se pueden corregir los abusos permitiendo que se denuncien publicamente, sin trabas y sin miedo[5] Esta es la mejor manera de asegurar el imperio de la ley por encima de la violencia.


[1] El letrado Sr. D. Ramon Diokno, en representacion del recurrente, y el Fiscal Auxiliar de Manila D. Julio Villamor, en representacion del recurrido.

[2] Los hechos confirmaron plenamente esta presunecion: el mitin monstruo que se celebro en la noche del 22 de Noviembre en virtud de nuestra resolucion concediendo el presente recurso de mandamus el mas grande que se haya celebrado jamas en Manila, segun la prensa, y al cual se calcula que asistieron unas 80,000 personas fue completamente pacifico y ordenado, no registrandose el menor incidente desagradable. Segun los periodicos, el mitin fue un magnifico acto de ciudadania militante y responsable, vindicatoria de la fe de todos aquellos que jamas habian dudado de la sensatez y cultura del pueblo de Manila.

[3] Madame Roland.

[4] En Mejico el lema, la consigna political es: "Sufragio efectivo, sin reeleccion." Los que conocen Mejico aseguran que, merced a esta consigna, la era de las convulsiones y guerras civiles en aquella republica ha pasado definitivamente a la historia.

[5] "No puedo pasar por alto una magistratura que contribuyo mucho a sostener el Gobierno de Roma; fue la de los censores. Hacian el censo del pueblo, y, ademas, como la fuerza de la republica consistia en la disciplina, la austeridad de las costumbres y la observacion constante de ciertos ritos, los censores corregian los abusos que la ley no habia previsto o que el magistrado ordinario no podia castigar. * * *

"El Gobierno de Roma fue admirable, porque desde su nacimiento, sea por espiritu del pueblo, la fuerza del Senado o la autoridad de cierots magistrados, estaba constituido de tal modo, que todo abuso de poder pudo ser siempre corregido.

"El Gobierno de Inglaterra es mas sabio, porque hay un cuerpo encargado de examinarlo continuamente y de examinarse a si mismo; sus errores son de suerte que nunca se prolongan, y por el espiritu de atencion que despiertan en el pais, son a menudo utiles.

"En una palabra: un Gobierno libre, siempre agitado, no podria mantenerse, si no es por sus propias leyes capaz de corregirse." ("Grandeza y decadencia da los romanos," por Montesquieu, pags. 74, 76 y 77.)

tags